... ...
Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in THE STUDIO The Studio is the journal of the Music Teachers' Association of New South Wales, Australia
Subtitled,   “A   motivational   book   for   music   pupils” and    opening    with    an    erudite    Chinese    proverb; Teachers    open    the    door,    but    you    must    enter    by yourself,   this   little   book   is   directed   at   the   student who   finds   practicing   a   bore   and   a   chore,   and   whilst recognising     the     end     result,     would     rather     be anywhere     than     constantly     repeating     the     same actions   on   the   instrument   in   order   to   make   that   end result happen! There   is   a   short   ‘For   Parents’   introduction   that   sets out   the   aim   of   the   book,      “.... to   inspire   pupils   to want      to      practice,      motivate      them      to      take responsibility   for   themselves   and   encourage   them to   persevere”.    Instrument-neutral,   the   publication is   divided   into   several   short   chapters   which   will engage   yet   not   tire   the   young   reader.   Consequently children   will   have   no   problem   in   understanding   the authors   clear   writing   style   and   the   ‘message’   he   is putting across. Little      stories      and      analogies      with      everyday activities   illustrate   and   reinforce   the   idea   of   regular practice - the why and how:
      ‘Why      learn      music?’,      ‘Is      Making      Music Difficult?’,     ‘A     New     Pupil     Is     Like    A     Baby,’ ‘Overcoming   Obstacles’   are   some   of   the   chapters that   deal   with   the   myriad   problems   encountered   by students.   The   chapters   are   dispersed   with   Aesop’s     fables   and   short   quotations   to   reinforce   particular concepts    and    to    motivate    the    student    to    think clearly   and   positively   about   the   need   for   serious practice.   Some   are   a   little   esoteric   but   most   easily understandable    viz:    By    perseverance    the    snail reached   the   ark”    [page   16]   and   Einstein’s   famous, It’s   not   that   I’m   so   smart,   it’s   just   that   I   stay   with my   problems   longer”   [page   61]   is   one   that   even the youngest child can comprehend. Clearly   presented   and   easy   to   read   for   the   specific age    group    of    10+    this    delightful    little    volume should   be   in   every   music   teachers   library   to   show and    recommend    to    their    students,    -    let    parents know    it    makes    a    wonderful    birthday    or    Xmas present   -   and   to   reinforce   for   themselves   ideas   on managing    that    age-old    problem    of    motivational practice. .     .     .     .     .     .
Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in THE STUDIO The Studio is the journal of the Music Teachers' Association of New South Wales, Australia
Subtitled,   “A   motivational   book   for   music   pupils”   and   opening with   an   erudite   Chinese   proverb;   Teachers   open   the   door,   but you   must   enter   by   yourself,   this   little   book   is   directed   at   the student   who   finds   practicing   a   bore   and   a   chore,   and   whilst recognising   the   end   result,   would   rather   be   anywhere   than constantly   repeating   the   same   actions   on   the   instrument   in order to make that end result happen! There   is   a   short   ‘For   Parents’   introduction   that   sets   out   the   aim of   the   book,      “.... to   inspire   pupils   to   want   to   practice,   motivate them   to   take   responsibility   for   themselves   and   encourage   them to   persevere”.    Instrument-neutral,   the   publication   is   divided into   several   short   chapters   which   will   engage   yet   not   tire   the young   reader.   Consequently   children   will   have   no   problem   in understanding     the     authors     clear     writing     style     and     the ‘message’ he is putting across. Little   stories   and   analogies   with   everyday   activities   illustrate and   reinforce   the   idea   of   regular   practice   -   the   why   and   how: ‘Why   learn   music?’,   ‘Is   Making   Music   Difficult?’,   ‘A   New Pupil   Is   Like   A   Baby,’   ‘Overcoming   Obstacles’   are   some   of the   chapters   that   deal   with   the   myriad   problems   encountered by   students.   The   chapters   are   dispersed   with   Aesop’s   fables and   short   quotations   to   reinforce   particular   concepts   and   to motivate   the   student   to   think   clearly   and   positively   about   the need   for   serious   practice.   Some   are   a   little   esoteric   but   most easily   understandable   viz:   By   perseverance   the   snail   reached the   ark”    [page   16]   and   Einstein’s   famous,   It’s   not   that   I’m   so smart,   it’s   just   that   I   stay   with   my   problems   longer”   [page   61] is one that even the youngest child can comprehend. Clearly   presented   and   easy   to   read   for   the   specific   age   group of   10+   this   delightful   little   volume   should   be   in   every   music teachers   library   to   show   and   recommend   to   their   students,   -   let parents   know   it   makes   a   wonderful   birthday   or   Xmas   present   - and   to   reinforce   for   themselves   ideas   on   managing   that   age- old problem of motivational practice. .     .     .     .     .     .
Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in THE STUDIO The Studio is the journal of the Music Teachers' Association of New South Wales, Australia
Subtitled,   “A   motivational   book   for   music pupils”   and   opening   with   an   erudite   Chinese proverb;    Teachers    open    the    door,    but    you must    enter    by    yourself,    this    little    book    is directed   at   the   student   who   finds   practicing   a bore   and   a   chore,   and   whilst   recognising   the end   result,   would   rather   be   anywhere   than constantly   repeating   the   same   actions   on   the instrument   in   order   to   make   that   end   result happen! There   is   a   short   ‘For   Parents’   introduction that   sets   out   the   aim   of   the   book,      “.... to inspire   pupils   to   want   to   practice,   motivate them    to    take    responsibility    for    themselves and      encourage      them      to      persevere”.   Instrument-neutral,       the       publication       is divided    into    several    short    chapters    which will   engage   yet   not   tire   the   young   reader. Consequently   children   will   have   no   problem in    understanding    the    authors    clear    writing style and the ‘message’ he is putting across. Little    stories    and    analogies    with    everyday activities   illustrate   and   reinforce   the   idea   of regular practice - the why and how:
    ‘Why    learn    music?’,    ‘Is    Making    Music Difficult?’,   ‘A   New   Pupil   Is   Like   A   Baby,’ ‘Overcoming    Obstacles’    are    some    of    the chapters   that   deal   with   the   myriad   problems encountered   by   students.   The   chapters   are dispersed    with    Aesop’s        fables    and    short quotations    to    reinforce    particular    concepts and   to   motivate   the   student   to   think   clearly and    positively    about    the    need    for    serious practice.   Some   are   a   little   esoteric   but   most easily   understandable   viz:   By   perseverance the   snail   reached   the   ark”    [page   16]   and Einstein’s    famous,    It’s    not    that    I’m    so smart,   it’s   just   that   I   stay   with   my   problems longer”    [page    61]    is    one    that    even    the youngest child can comprehend. Clearly   presented   and   easy   to   read   for   the specific    age    group    of    10+    this    delightful little    volume    should    be    in    every    music teachers   library   to   show   and   recommend   to their   students,   -   let   parents   know   it   makes   a wonderful   birthday   or   Xmas   present   -   and   to reinforce   for   themselves   ideas   on   managing that      age-old      problem      of      motivational practice. .     .     .     .     .     .