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Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in CLAVIER COMPANION Reviewed by Beth Gigante Klingenstein.
Now I Love Music Practice: A Motivational Book for Music Pupils by Ron Ottley. In two significant ways, Now I Love Music Practice differs from the seven other books on practice currently in my library. First, Ottley writes for children who are just learning to make decisions for themselves, rather than for older children or adults. Second, instead of explaining how to  practice, the book focuses completely on convincing young students of the rewards of productive practice. One of the main points made early in the book is that students need to be on what the author calls the “right side of the tipping point.” To explain, Ottley describes a gardener who is on the right side: he gardens every day, setting small attainable goals that make his gardening successful. His garden is beautiful. He enjoys his work, and the daily tasks are manageable and gratifying. A second gardener, however, who is on the wrong side of the tipping point,doesn’t enjoy gardening, has an overgrown garden, and is discouraged by the enormity of the task at hand. Using this example, Ottley transitions easily to a description of being on the right side of the practice tipping point and achieving the small victories that will lead to musical success. “The more you do the better you become,” he writes. “The better you become the more you enjoy it. The more you enjoy it the happier practice sessions are and the more satisfaction you get.” On the other hand, for those on the
Along with such stories, Ottley uses quotations and fables to illustrate his points at an appropriate level for young students. I always appreciate the wisdom of others, and Ottley chooses some real gems to illustrate his points (such as Walter Elliott’s “Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after another”). Aesop’s fable “The Silkworm and the Spider” highlights the value of slow and steady progress, and “The Grasshopper and the Ant” teaches that, even if it is hard to see progress immediately, practice pays of in the future. Ottley is a piano teacher in New Zealand, and he frequently and effectively emphasizes that students need to be responsible for their own success. Students are reminded that no matter how much a parent or teacher provides, the student must want to succeed in order to do so. Ottley also warns that practice can sometimes be difficult and comments on the value of hard work, doing one’s best, and overcoming obstacles. Although these are good points, at times they sound a little preachy, and I am not sure that all young students will accept them wholeheartedly. This short readable book fills a gap in the literature on practice and can serve as an excellent motivational tool for young learners. In fact, after reading just a few pages, I decided to purchase a copy for each of my students. I look forward to the discussions this book will foster and the future teaching moments I will address with Ottley’s reminders or quotes. As Ottley says “We won’t know how far we can go unless we persevere long enough to find out” Copyright © 2012, Clavier Companion. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in CLAVIER COMPANION Reviewed by Beth Gigante Klingenstein.
Now I Love Music Practice: A Motivational Book for Music Pupils by Ron Ottley. In two significant ways, Now I Love Music Practice  differs from the seven other books on practice currently in my library. First, Ottley writes for children who are just learning to make decisions for themselves, rather than for older children or adults. Second, instead of explaining how to practice, the book focuses completely on convincing young students of the rewards of productive practice. One of the main points made early in the book is that students need to be on what the author calls the “right side of the tipping point.” To explain, Ottley describes a gardener who is on the right side: he gardens every day, setting small attainable goals that make his gardening successful. His garden is beautiful. He enjoys his work, and the daily tasks are manageable and gratifying. A second gardener, however, who is on the wrong side of the tipping point,doesn’t enjoy gardening, has an overgrown garden, and is discouraged by the enormity of the task at hand. Using this example, Ottley transitions easily to a description of being on the right side of the practice tipping point and achieving the small victories that will lead to musical success. “The more you do the better you become,” he writes. “The better you become the more you enjoy it. The more you enjoy it the happier practice sessions are and the more satisfaction you get.” On the other hand, for those on the wrong side, practice is stressful and full of overwhelming challenges that make progress arduous.
Along with such stories, Ottley uses quotations and fables to illustrate his points at an appropriate level for young students. I always appreciate the wisdom of others, and Ottley chooses some real gems to illustrate his points (such as Walter Elliott’s “Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after another”). Aesop’s fable “The Silkworm and the Spider” highlights the value of slow and steady progress, and “The Grasshopper and the Ant” teaches that, even if it is hard to see progress immediately, practice pays of in the future. Ottley is a piano teacher in New Zealand, and he frequently and effectively emphasizes that students need to be responsible for their own success. Students are reminded that no matter how much a parent or teacher provides, the student must want to succeed in order to do so. Ottley also warns that practice can sometimes be difficult and comments on the value of hard work, doing one’s best, and overcoming obstacles. Although these are good points, at times they sound a little preachy, and I am not sure that all young students will accept them wholeheartedly. This short readable book fills a gap in the literature on practice and can serve as an excellent motivational tool for young learners. In fact, after reading just a few pages, I decided to purchase a copy for each of my students. I look forward to the discussions this book will foster and the future teaching moments I will address with Ottley’s reminders or quotes. As Ottley says “We won’t know how far we can go unless we persevere long enough to find out” Copyright © 2012, Clavier Companion. Used with permission. All rights reserved.
Now I Love Music Practice
A review published in CLAVIER COMPANION Reviewed by Beth Gigante Klingenstein.
Now I Love Music Practice: A Motivational Book for Music Pupils by Ron Ottley. In two significant ways, Now I Love Music Practice differs from the seven other books on practice currently in my library. First, Ottley writes for children who are just learning to make decisions for themselves, rather than for older children or adults. Second, instead of explaining how to practice, the book focuses completely on convincing young students of the rewards of productive practice. One of the main points made early in the book is that students need to be on what the author calls the “right side of the tipping point.” To explain, Ottley describes a gardener who is on the right side: he gardens every day, setting small attainable goals that make his gardening successful. His garden is beautiful. He enjoys his work, and the daily tasks are manageable and gratifying. A second gardener, however, who is on the wrong side of the tipping point,doesn’t enjoy gardening, has an overgrown garden, and is discouraged by the enormity of the task at hand. Using this example, Ottley transitions easily to a description of being on the right side of the practice tipping point and achieving the small victories that will lead to musical success. “The more you do the better you become,” he writes. “The better you become the more you enjoy it. The more you enjoy it the happier practice sessions are and
Along with such stories, Ottley uses quotations and fables to illustrate his points at an appropriate level for young students. I always appreciate the wisdom of others, and Ottley chooses some real gems to illustrate his points (such as Walter Elliott’s “Perseverance is not a long race; it is many short races one after another”). Aesop’s fable “The Silkworm and the Spider” highlights the value of slow and steady progress, and “The Grasshopper and the Ant” teaches that, even if it is hard to see progress immediately, practice pays of in the future. Ottley is a piano teacher in New Zealand, and he frequently and effectively emphasizes that students need to be responsible for their own success. Students are reminded that no matter how much a parent or teacher provides, the student must want to succeed in order to do so. Ottley also warns that practice can sometimes be difficult and comments on the value of hard work, doing one’s best, and overcoming obstacles. Although these are good points, at times they sound a little preachy, and I am not sure that all young students will accept them wholeheartedly. This short readable book fills a gap in the literature on practice and can serve as an excellent motivational tool for young learners. In fact, after reading just a few pages, I decided to purchase a copy for each of my students. I look forward to the discussions this book will foster and the future teaching moments I will address with Ottley’s reminders or quotes. As Ottley says “We won’t know how far we can go unless we persevere long enough to find out” Copyright © 2012, Clavier Companion.